* Tickets to CVPA and UCLS events are sold exclusively through our box office locations and ETix website, and nowhere else. Tickets purchased through third-party vendors can not be honored.

UNCG Theatre Parking Information

Parking for Cars:

Complimentary parking is available in C and A permit spaces in lot 7 (near the intersection of Tate St. and Oakland St.) after 5:00 p.m. on weekdays and any time on weekends. Accessible parking is available behind the Graham Building in lot 7. If you will need an accessible space during a weekday matinee performance (before 5:00 p.m.), please inform Theatre Manager, Joshua Ritter, at jsritter@uncg.edu in advance so she can provide you with a complimentary permit. Please do not park in the spaces reserved for the Weatherspoon Museum or the business (E.g., FedEx) across from the UNCG theaters. If possible, we recommend being dropped off at the theater for the easiest access.

Parking for Buses:

Bus parking is available on Kenilworth St. To get to Kenilworth from Taylor Theatre, take a right on Spring Garden St. Then, take a right on Stirling St. (across from Yum Yum Better Ice Cream). From there, take a left on Theta St. After that, take a left on Kenilworth St. Parking is available on Kenilworth St. It says “No Parking,” but this is only for cars. The spaces on Kenilworth are reserved for buses.

Accessibility

Please visit our accessibility page to find information about services and accommodations available to our patrons.

UNCG Theatre Frame/Works, Headshots/Bios, and more

UNCG Theatre Box Office

Phone Number: 336.334.4392Hours: Mon – Fri, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Address: 406 Tate St, Greensboro, NC 27403

To purchase discounted group tickets, please call our group sales manager at 336-334-4015 or e

mail them at grpsales@uncg.edu.

buy tickets online

MARISOL

By José Rivera

Directed by Jim Wren

Dates: On-demand streaming October 15-17

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit https://www.etix.com/ticket/v/15070/taylor-theatre

Age Rating: PG-13

Frame/Works Discussion via Zoom: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, October 19

Run Time: Approx. 1 hr. and 30 min.

Programs, bios, and more!


Summary:

Cosmic chaos erupts in this apocalyptic comedy of urban realities and guardian angels. Marisol Perez, a young single professional woman living in the asphalt jungle of the Bronx, finds herself sucked into a whirlpool of homelessness, violence and racism when her guardian angel deserts her to fight in what may be the final battle in heaven. —Playbill.com

“Winner of the 1993 Obie Award. An apocalyptic urban fantasy which urges society to ‘wake up’ and somehow find a way to recover the long-lost and much-needed compassion for our fellow man, as this is the only way to save our world.” —Dramatists Play Service

“…Rivera’s cruelly slanted world view…is fascinating.” —NY Post

“An urban nightmare that grows increasingly bleaker for its young heroine, “Marisol” is a dark fantasia that reflects a number of the social and spiritual troubles of the early 1990s.” — The New York Times

Marisol is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.


SKELETON CREW

By Dominique Morisseau

Directed by Mya Brown

Dates: On-demand streaming November 5-7

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit https://www.etix.com/ticket/v/15070/taylor-theatre

Age Rating: PG-13

Frame/Works Discussion via Zoom: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 9

Run Time: Approx. 2 hrs.

Programs, bios, and more!


Summary:
At the start of the Great Recession, one of the last auto stamping plants in Detroit is on shaky ground. Each of the workers have to make choices on how to move forward if their plant goes under. Shanita has to decide how she’ll support herself and her unborn child, Faye has to decide how and where she’ll live, and Dez has to figure out how to make his ambitious dreams a reality. Power dynamics shift as their manager Reggie is torn between doing right by his work family, and by the red tape in his office. Powerful and tense, Skeleton Crew is the third of Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit cycle trilogy. ⁠—Samuel French

“Ms. Morisseau works her big themes on a small, closely patterned canvas.’” — The New York Times

“In “Skeleton Crew,” the American worker, cranky, caring, overburdened and endangered, is given her 21st century dramatic due.” —L.A. Times

“Skeleton Crew” is presented by arrangement with Concord Theatricals on behalf of Samuel French, Inc. www.concordtheatricals.com


HEAR OUR VOICES: A MUSICAL THEATRE SONG CYCLE

Directed by Erin Farrell Speer

Featuring New Songs By:

Luna Abreu-Santana, Utsav Bhargava, Eli Cohen, Shane Dittmar, Jacob Fjeldheim
Kenneth Helman, Vincent Jamal Hooper, Keurim Hur, J. Quinton Johnson, Gaby Mank, Rori Nogee, Julia Riew

Dates: On-demand streaming November 12-14

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit https://www.etix.com/ticket/v/15070/taylor-theatre

Age Rating: PG-13

Frame/Works Discussion via Zoom: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, November 16

Run Time: Approx. 70 min.

Programs, bios, and more!


Summary:
As part of a mission to center marginalized voices in American Theatre, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro School of Theatre will present a song cycle focused on new work by BIPOC, LGBTQ+ and disabled writers. UNCG fully supports and values an inclusive community with visible and meaningful representation of diversity. We seek to promote a climate of civility and respect, where diverse viewpoints and experiences are welcomed. UNCG is committed to protecting the rights of all to ensure that each person in our community is empowered, valued and respected for their contributions to the mission of this university. As a minority-serving institution, we embrace our role as serving a large, diverse student body and we are committed to our mission as providing access and opportunity for all.


FALL MFA DIRECTOR CANDIDATE ONE-ACT PRODUCTIONS

Dates: On-demand streaming December 3-5

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

MFA Directing candidates will share their one-act productions:

Here We Go by Caryl Churchill 

Directed by Karen Sabo

Incognito

by Janet Allard 

Directed by Chris Gilly-Forrer

The Arkansaw Bear

by Aurand Harris 

Directed by Hayley Greenstreet

Feeding the Moonfish

by Barbara Wiechmann

Directed by John Perine

Noah And The Ark

by Sheila Smolensky

Directed by Derya Ağaoğlu


SAINT JOAN

By George Bernard Shaw

Directed by John Gulley

Dates: On-demand streaming March 18-20

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit https://www.etix.com/ticket/v/15070/taylor-theatre

Age Rating: PG-13

Frame/Works Discussion via Zoom: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March 22

Run Time: Approx. 2 hrs and 20 min.

Programs, bios, and more!

Summary:
Saint Joan is Bernard Shaw’s greatest play. At its center is the most remarkable teenage girl in history. But who is she? The divinely-inspired savior of France? A dangerously clever charlatan? Or a pathetically deluded country girl? It all depends on your point of view. Whatever she is, eventually Joan is bound to become an embarrassment to the male-dominated world she has turned upside-down. And then what? —Shaw Festival

“Joan’s religious fanaticism, reaching us through the perspective of 500 years and then filtered through Shaw’s imagination, becomes the protest of a plain-spoken individual conscience.” —The Guardian
“She had appeared to violate the rules. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted. And that persistence, deadlier than the kind that earned Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren her infamous rebuke, led directly to Joan’s death at the stake. —The Buffalo News


SPRING MFA THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES CANDIDATE ONE-ACT PRODUCTIONS 

Dates: On-demand streaming April 1-3

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

Summary:

MFA Directing candidates will share their one-act productions. 

Round Pegs, Square Pegs by Mary Hall Surface 

Directed by Hayley Greenstreet

Age Rating: G

Running Time: Approx. 40 min. 

Summary:

Round Pegs, Square Pegs by Mary Hall Surface takes place in a world incredibly different, and yet shockingly similar to our own. Everything is fun and games for the Round and Square communities, until we realize it’s not. The power struggle between Big Round and Big Square is no longer one that is safe or reasonable. Small Round and Small Square want to share ideas and change the fate of their world, but will they be able to undo the systemic issues in place?

Where Words Once Were by Finegan Kruckemeyer

Directed by John Perine

Age Rating: PG

Running Time: Approx. 1 hour

Summary:

Where Words Once Were is a dystopian fable that looks at life in the last city on Earth due to rising water levels. The City, with citizens from the four corners of the Earth, has adopted The Language, a set of 1,000 words that are permissible to use in order to eliminate conflict over communication struggles. Those who speak words not recognized by The Language consequently lose their right to speak. Orhan, son of Alli the baker, and his two best friends have never questioned the City’s rules. When seeds of resistance begin to sprout, allegiances of the citizens are tested, causing everyone to question the power of their words.

SPRING MFA DIRECTOR CANDIDATE ONE-ACT PRODUCTIONS 

Dates: On-demand streaming April 8-10

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 starting August 18 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

The World On A Hill by Alice Childress

Directed by Chris Forrer

Age Rating: PG

Summary:

The World on a Hill takes place in the West Indies. Norma, an affluent white woman, has taken her young son, Lionel, for a picnic up a hill near their summer vacation home. After Lionel rushes off down the hill in search of sweets, Winston, a Black teenager born and raised on the island, enters, and Norma must face the reality of her prejudice. From there Childress subverts and ultimately transcends the stereotypes upon which we view each other, moving towards an intersectional argument that perhaps the recognition of a shared struggle against structures of power will save us all–so long as we can check our own biases long enough to start the conversation.

Oral History Project by Karen Sabo

Directed by Karen Sabo

Age Rating: PG-13

Summary:

There is power in our true stories. This is the engine behind How We Got Here: An Oral History Play, which is based entirely on transcripts from the Southern Oral History Database. Using four actors playing ten diverse characters, this show features stories of regular people who want ordinary things–lunch at the Greensboro Woolworth’s, to be pregnant and professional, to sit downstairs at a movie theatre–but who find they must fight for respect and for equal treatment. Using stories largely gathered in the Carolinas, this piece uses the immediacy of theatre to breathe life into oral and social history, and to help us understand where we are in the American struggle for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Meet the Directors!


SPARTAN NEW MUSICALS: TWO WORLD PREMIERE MUSICAL SHORT FILMS

Flatbush Avenue

Music and Lyrics and Book by Madeline Myers

Directed by Michael Flannery

Dates: On-demand streaming April 22-24

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

Age Rating: PG

Run Time: 20 min.

Programs, bios, and more!

Frame/Works Discussion: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, April 26, 2021

Summary: 

Flatbush Avenue tells the story of three young women in 1955 who, like the rest of the neighborhood, are obsessed with the then-Brooklyn Dodgers. The girls’ lives are changed forever when they are challenged to play a game of street stickball.  Flatbush Avenue is a story about community, raising your voice in the face of injustice, and the enduring power of female friendship.

Radio: A Musical Ghost Story

Music and Lyrics by Murphy Taylor Smith

Book by Emerson Mae Smith

Directed by Erin Farrell Speer

Dates: On-demand streaming April 22-24

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

Age Rating: PG-13

Run Time: 30 min.

Frame/Works Discussion: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, April 26, 2021

Summary: 

Lowell, a young woman still reeling from the recent loss of her brother, encounters a ghost in the showers of her gym. It sings to her, strange static only made comprehensible through her headphones – but is it a beckoning call or a warning?


POLAROID STORIES

By Naomi Iizuka

Directed by Donna Bradby

Dates: On-demand streaming April 29 – May 1

Tickets: Call the UNCG Theatre Box Office at 336-334-4392 or visit www.UNCGTHEATRE.com

Age Rating: PG-13

Frame/Works Discussion via Zoom: 7:00 p.m. on Monday, May 3 

Run Time: Approx. 2 hours

Programs, bios, and more!

Summary:

A visceral blend of classical mythology and real life stories told by street kids, Naomi lizuka’s Polaroid Stories journeys into a dangerous world where myth-making fulfills a fierce need for transcendence, where storytelling has the power to transform a reality in which characters’ lives are continually threatened, devalued and effaced. Not all the stories these characters tell are true; some are lies, wild yams, clever deceits, baroque fabrications. But whether or not a homeless kid invents an incredible history for himself isn’t the point, explains diarist-of-the-street Jim Grimsley. “All these stories and lies add up to something like the truth.” Inspired in part by Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Iizuka’s Polaroid Stories takes place on an abandoned pier on the outermost edge of a city, a way stop for dreamers, dealers and desperadoes, a no-man’s land where runaways seek camaraderie, refuge and escape. Serpentine routes from the street to the heart characterize the interactions in this spellbinding tale of young people pushed to society’s fringe. Informed, as well, by interviews with young prostitutes and street kids, Polaroid Stories conveys a whirlwind of psychic disturbance, confusion and longing. Like their mythic counterparts, these modem-day mortals are engulfed by needs that burn and consume. Their language mixes poetry and profanity, imbuing the play with lyricism and great theatrical force.

—Dramatists Play Services