Frequently Asked Questions - Prospective Student Information

Are scholarships available for undergraduate students?

Yes. Outstanding students majoring in music will be selected to receive music scholarships based on the results of their audition and will receive notification via e-mail. Students interested in being considered for music scholarships should plan to audition in person no later than the final regular audition day in the academic year preceding expected enrollment. Music scholarships are made on a one-year basis and are renewable for four years contingent upon satisfactory academic and musical progress.

Can I visit the music area before enrolling at UNCG?

Yes. Prospective music students are encouraged to visit if desired. Visits are typically scheduled Monday thru Thursday. During the visit, students will be able to speak with a representative from the music area and to sit-in on current classes, if available. Visits can occur during the academic year or the summer. To arrange a visit, please contact Miranda Freeman at (336) 334-3639 or msfreema@uncg.edu. At least two weeks advance notice is requested.

How should I prepare to be a successful music major?

Private lessons on your primary instrument would be very beneficial in preparation for your audition for admittance as a music major. Your local band or chorus director may be able to provide suggestions for private lesson instructors.

In preparation to be a music major, knowledge of music theory and ear training would also be most helpful. It is suggested that prospective students utilize a music theory textbook or other resource, such as http://www.musictheory.net, to develop these skills.

All majors must also demonstrate piano proficiency before graduation from the music degree program. Thus, it is desirable that prospective students develop these skills before enrollment. Alfred's Group Piano textbook may be helpful in acquiring these skills.

Can I complete a degree in 4 years?

Yes. All of the music degree programs can be completed in 4 years. Due to the fact that coursework in music is sequential, careful planning must take place to insure appropriate progression through the degree program. Each semester, you will be required to meet with your academic advisor to discuss course options, scheduling, and degree progression.

What courses will I be taking in my major?

The courses that you will be taking vary depending on your chosen major. Most programs incorporate elements of private study with the instructor of your instrument, music theory and ear training, music history, technology in music, and ensembles. For example, the Music Performance degree program requires extended music performance coursework, while the Music Education degree program requires coursework in education. To view a sample plan of study, please click here.

Do I take any courses outside of music?

Yes. All students that attend UNCG are also expected to complete general education coursework. The combination of these courses is designed to build foundational learning skills and promote holistic intellectual growth. These include courses in areas of literature, fine arts (other than music), historical perspectives, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, and reasoning and discourse. Music majors typically only take one to two non-music courses each semester, spread out throughout the degree program.

Is there an additional fee or cost for private lessons with faculty?

There is no fee for music majors to study privately; UNCG tuition covers private lessons.

If I am a music major, is it possible to study abroad?

Yes. In fact, students are encouraged to study abroad if possible. UNCG has many study abroad and student exchange opportunities. It is important to note that study abroad must be carefully planned within the curriculum. In some cases, study abroad is possible during a 4 year degree. If you are thinking of studying abroad, please notify your academic advisor before or during your first semester of study at UNCG. Please contact Amanda Hughes, the Director of Undergraduate Advising, at (336) 334-3638 or arhughes@uncg.edu.

For more information about study abroad, please visit: http://www.uncg.edu/ipg/sae/study_abroad_exchanges.html

What activities are typical of a student pursuing a music degree? And how much time do they require?

Individual practice on your instrument is an important part of being a music major or minor. Daily practice is expected of students who wish to major or minor in music. Specific expectations for practicing will be provided by your private lessons instructor.

Depending on your degree program, other activities may be expected. For example, Music Performance majors may be required to seek out opportunities for solo and group performance, both within and outside of the School. Similarly, Music Education majors are expected to develop teaching skills through observations and practicum experiences before student teaching.

It is also expected that music majors and minors support their fellow artists. Attendance at music and performing arts functions is vital to fostering appreciation of the performing arts, as well as gaining a broad knowledge of various musical experiences.

In addition to the above, several student groups are available to those interested in participating in co-curricular activities in music. These include student chapters in Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Mu Phi Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Iota, Collegiate Music Educators National Conference, American Choral Directors Association, and the American String Teachers Association.

What do music graduates do after graduation?

Our degree programs are designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for a variety of experiences. However, each degree program has a unique focus. Depending on which program you choose, opportunities will be available in music performance, music education, and other arts fields. Many students also choose to continue study in music, pursuing graduate degrees.

Are there any music courses that non-music majors can take?

Yes. There are many courses that non-music majors or minors can take to continue participation in musical activities. These include music appreciation, group classes in piano, voice or guitar study, and ensembles. Please contact the College of Visual and Performing Arts for a list of options.

Need more information? Please contact the College of Visual and Performing Arts at (336) 334-5789 or music@uncg.edu.

Are graduate assistantships available for graduate students?

Yes, assistantships are available to academically and musically gifted applicants. To be considered for an assistantship, applicants must complete a successful live audition on or before the last audition date, and have completed the application process. Applicants will be notified via email if they have been chosen for an assistantship.

For more information on availability of assistantships, visit this page. To apply for an assistantship, download and complete the Graduate Assistantship in Music application form (.PDF format, 741.06 KB) and submit it with your application materials to the SMTD.

What courses will I be taking?

Your course of study will vary greatly depending upon your chosen field of study. See the Graduate Plans of Study are coming soon.

Do I take any courses outside of music?

Although courses outside music are not required for M.M. and D.M.A. degree programs, there are opportunities to explore interests outside the field of music.

Can I schedule a visit to the Music Departments?

Yes. Prospective music students are permitted to visit the music departments if desired. Faculty members are open to visiting students observing lessons and classes with advance notice. For assistance contacting professors and planning your visit please contact Sara Hunt in the music office at 336-334-5794.

Do I have to audition to be accepted as theatre (acting) student?

Auditions are required for admission to the MFA in Acting degree program. For undergraduate degree programs, auditions and interviews/portfolio reviews for admittance to specialized BFA track degrees (Acting, Design and Technology, Technical Production, and Theatre Education) occur once you are enrolled at UNCG and usually occur at the end of the first or second semester.

May I sit in on theatre classes when I visit the campus?

Yes, we advocate prospective students observing our professors in their classroom elements. Please make arrangements for this opportunity when you call to set up a visit and/or tour of campus (336-334-4032).

I want to major or minor in Dance. Is an audition required?

No audition is required to be a Dance minor; any student may declare a Dance minor online. For a list of Dance minor requirements, see here.

An audition is required to be a major in the Dance Department. Auditions are held twice a year. Students who have been admitted through audition and are declared as a dance major are given priority in registering for dance technique classes, and many other Dance courses are closed to non-majors. For information on the next audition, see our application here.

Must I do a live audition? Can I send a video?

The Department normally requires a live audition. An exception is made for international students. If you need to request the alternative audition process (requiring a DVD with footage of your dancing, spoken responses to interview questions, and a written essay supervised by a teacher), please contact Jeff Aguiar (jbaguiar@uncg.edu).

I am in advanced level technique classes at my studio or school. Do I have to start at the beginning level at UNCG?

Placement for majors is determined at the time of the audition; the majority of admitted majors start at the "advanced beginning" level in contemporary dance and ballet, although a few are placed higher and some are placed at the beginning level. Students who have not received level placement through the audition process may take a separate placement class the first day of classes each semester (5pm, Coleman 322). Unless placed higher by the Department, students may take only beginning level technique classes. The Department reviews student progress each semester to determine eligibility for moving to the next level. See here for more information.

Are scholarships available for undergraduate students?

Yes. Scholarships are awarded in the spring for the following academic year. For information regarding all dance-related scholarships, please visit here.

What kind of dance classes does the Department offer?

In addition to contemporary dance and ballet technique classes, the Department offers African, jazz, tap, and various forms of global dance when instructors are available. We also offer different movement techniques in our "Somatic Practices" course. In addition, there are classes in improvisation, choreography, dance production, repertory/performance, dance appreciation, dance history, applied anatomy/kinesiology/injury prevention, dance education, technology for dance, and other courses to help prepare students for their transition beyond UNCG.

Do dance majors take courses outside of dance?

Yes. All students who attend UNCG are also expected to complete general education coursework. The combination of these courses is designed to build foundational learning skills and promote holistic intellectual growth. These include courses in areas of literature, fine arts (other than dance), historical perspectives, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, and reasoning and discourse. Dance majors usually complete most of these courses in their first two years.

How much will I be able to perform?

Dance majors are encouraged to carefully consider the number of commitments to rehearsals/performances they take on each semester. Artists working in the Department create different types of works, each of which makes unique demands on performers in terms of time, commitment, and physical and mental concentration. Avoiding an overload of artistic commitments will enable you to do your best in each work, keep up with your other responsibilities, and also help you to prevent injury.

There are opportunities to perform in works choreographed by faculty and undergraduate and graduate choreographers for many of the 5-8 different concerts/events presented by the Department each semester. There are additional opportunities to dance in other College of Visual and Performing Arts productions outside of the Department. There are five classes in the dance curriculum that offer credit for formal performance opportunities for undergraduate dance majors. Some require a separate audition, and some are available to any student at a certain level of dance technique. Students are not required to sign up for university credit for dancing in other students' works for various class projects. See information on this in the Undergraduate Handbook for Dance: here.

Can I complete a degree in 4 years?

Yes, for the most part, although this depends on choices made by individual students as well as the initial placement level. Students in the BFA and those seeking teacher licensure need to plan their schedules carefully, especially if they are hoping to study abroad. Students expecting to earn a BFA who are placed at the beginning level in contemporary dance can expect to spend at least 4.5 years in the program.

Students who choose to complete a second major in addition to Dance are advised to select the BA program. Because some second majors require additional time, prospective students considering a second major should discuss this with the Undergraduate Coordinator.

Due to the fact that coursework in dance is sequential, careful planning must take place to insure appropriate progression through the degree program. This is especially true for students in the BFA, those seeking teacher licensure, those planning study abroad, and those with a second major. Each semester, you will be required to meet with your academic advisor to discuss course options, scheduling, and degree progression.

If I am admitted as a transfer student, how long will it take me to complete my degree?

It depends on which degree you select, which courses you have already taken, and the level of dance technique at which you begin.

If I am a dance major, is it possible to study abroad?

Yes. In fact, students are encouraged to study abroad if possible. UNCG has many study abroad and student exchange opportunities. It is important to note that study abroad must be carefully planned within the curriculum. If you are thinking of studying abroad, please notify your academic advisor before or during your first semester of study at UNCG. For more information about Study Abroad, see this section in the Undergraduate Handbook in Dance: here.

May I visit the campus and take or watch classes?

Yes, but by appointment only. See this page for more details.

What can I do with a dance degree?

Our degree programs are designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for a variety of careers. For more information, see here.

Does UNCG have care for injured dancers?

An athletic trainer is available for dance students approximately ten hours a week. See here. In addition, there is a physician specializing in sports medicine at the Student Health Center on certain days of the week. The Department works with students who are injured to help them make decisions to help them make the best short- and long-term decisions about completing degree requirements in case the student has to avoid dancing for an extended period to rehabilitate an injury or recover from illness.

I see that an internship is required. Do I have to initiate and secure this internship and when does it take place?

The Arts Administration internship is usually completed at course MTD 499 and in the senior year of the student. Students are placed in Arts Administration internships based on their area of interests and areas of needed experience and growth potential. All Arts Admin interns are interviewed and placed through artsgreensboro (http://artsgreensboro.org) .

Are there opportunities to work in Arts Administration for financial compensation on campus?

Yes, there are positions at many campus arts/cultural venues where an Arts Administration student may work for financial compensation. A short list and contact information is below:

UNCG Auditorium in House Management & Technical Theatre positions Brian Fuller at bsfuller@uncg.edu
UNCG Theatre Box Office positions Jody Kaizen at jtcauthe@uncg.edu
May-June Summer Box Office positions Jody Kaizen at jtcauthe@uncg.edu
Poster Distribution Jody Kaizen at jtcauthe@uncg.edu
UNCG Student Employment Office offers a wide variety of campus part-time work positions http://csc.uncg.edu/students/studentemploymentoffice/

What sorts of careers are available to an Arts Administration graduate?

Arts Administration is an exciting field that encompasses fundraising, marketing, audience development, programming, and cultural policy. Arts Administration alumni can expect to work in arts and cultural companies covering areas such as Executive Director/Leadership, Grantswritering, Social Media Marketing, Museum Curatorship, Government Agencies, Non-Profit Management, etc.

How do I apply for a degree in studio art?

There is no secondary admissions process to the art department. Students admitted to UNCG may select the BA major in studio art.

How do I gain admission to the BFA programs in studio art?

All incoming students with an interest in studio art must complete the requirements of the Foundation Program (add link), generally within their first year at UNCG. Admissions to the BFA programs (with concentrations in Painting, Printmaking and Drawing, Ceramics and Sculpture, Photography, New Media and Design, and Art Education) is by portfolio review only. Students submit their work, in the Fall term following the completion of the foundations program. The Foundations Program includes intensive advising about the BFA program, the process of being admitted to it, and the advantages to both the BA and the BFA programs. See here for more information about the School of Art’s Foundations Program and the process for applying to the BFA (add link).

May I reapply to the BFA program if denied the first time?

Students not admitted to the BFA program may reapply once more and after working with faculty to improve and enlarge the application portfolio. Reapplications are generally made in the spring term following the initial application has been denied.

Why would I want to pursue a BA in studio art?

The BFA is a first professional degree in the visual arts and is generally intended for students committed to a career in the visual or commercial arts. The BA degree in Studio Art is ideal for students interested in exploring their visual creativity within the context of a liberal arts education, for students who might wish to pursue opportunities after college outside the arts, or for students who wish to pursue a double major, combining an interest in the visual arts with other academic fields.

I am a transfer student. When may I apply for the BFA program?

Transfer students make up a significant portion of our art majors. Each student, however, represents an individual case. Studio courses from a different institution do not always transfer as required courses in our curriculum. All transfer students must, if admitted with all foundations requirements completed or when they finish them at UNCG, apply to the BFA program through the School of Arts regular BFA application process. Transfer students are encouraged to seek advising as soon as they are admitted to UNCG in order to understand and plan for a timely path to graduation.

Why don’t I see a BFA concentration in Graphic Design or Visual Communications?

It is very important to understand that UNCG’s School of Art is committed to a fine arts education for all its students. We do not at this time offer degrees in applied or commercial art. Student’s interested in design, however, should consider the New Media and Design concentration which gives our students the requisite skills in design at all levels and can result in a portfolio that allows a graduate to be highly competitive in the design job market or in applications to graduate programs. In addition, students may seek internship experiences in the industry, for credit, that offer the real world experience so crucial to first-time job seekers after graduation.