Arts Summit 2019

Keynote Speaker: Lorena Wolffer

For over twenty years, the work produced by artist and cultural activist Lorena Wolffer (Mexico City, 1971) has been an ongoing site for resistance and enunciation at the intersection between art and activism. While her own artwork addresses issues related to the cultural fabrication of gender and advocates women’s rights, agency and voices, she has also produced, facilitated, and curated dozens of projects with numerous artists in platforms such as museums, public spaces, and television. From the creation of radical cultural interventions with various communities of women to pioneering pedagogical models for the collective development of situated knowledge, these projects are produced within an inventive arena that underlines the pertinence of experimental languages and displaces the border between so-called high and low culture. Wolffer’s work—a stage for the voices, representations, and narratives of others, usually invisible in the Mexican scenario— brings to light the possibility of a reality grounded in respect and equality.

Schedule of Events

January 31, 2019

9:00-9:15Arrival
9:15-9:30Welcoming remarks
9:30-10:45Keynote by Lorena Wolffer
10:45-11:00Transition to Panel
11:00-12:15Panel Discussion with Q&A
12:15-2:00Lunch break
2:00-2:50Workshops (See below for descriptions and locations)
Location: UNCG Auditorium, Tate Street, Greensboro, NC

Attendance by CVPA majors is required for the events from 9am to 12:15pm. Afternoon workshop attendance is optional.


“Activating Democracy: Making Manifestos”
Sheryl Oring
Elliott University Center (EUC),
Elm Room

(limit 15 participants)
In this workshop, participants will be invited to create their own political manifestos that address the issues they value most and discuss how this relates to their own art practice.
“We Are Here: Imagining a World without Sexual Violence”
Lynden Harris
Elliott University Center (EUC),
Dogwood Room

(limit 25 participants)
Join us for a reading of monologues sharing the many voices and perspectives surrounding campus sexual assault.  Following the reading, we’ll respond as a community to the stories we heard and together develop a vision of a world free from sexual violence.


Time: 2-2:50pm, DATE TBD (all workshops are happening at the same time, so you can only sign up for one.)
ALL MAJORS ARE WELCOME to any workshop.

Any questions about the workshops, please contact Hannah Grannemann, Assistant Professor and Director of the Arts Administration program, at hagranne@uncg.edu.

click here to sign up


Duane Cyrus

Duane Cyrus is founding director of Theatre of Movement and professor at the UNCG where he teaches courses focused on the development of artists with skill to sustain careers in today’s current environment. Duane Cyrus is a Bessie award nominated performing/creative artist whose work focuses on the confluence of questions created by positioning moving bodies in conceptual environments. His work is informed by research of Black American and Caribbean culture. Cyrus has worked in a range of genres from contemporary dance to visual art. A graduate of the Juilliard School he danced with the Martha Graham Dance Company and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, in musical theater (including the original London production of Disney’s The Lion King), on television, and in a variety of other venues. He has worked as an independent artist and director of Cyrus Art Production LLC (2006-14) throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia as teacher, performer, and choreographer, and was also a visiting lecturer at the University of Illinois––where he also received his MFA in choreography. Duane is a two-time North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship recipient and Coleman Entrepreneurship Fellow. Cyrus is also a collaborative performer for Cynthia Oliver’s work Virago Man Dem that premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2017.

Pierce Freelon

Pierce Freelon is a professor, director, musician, Emmy-Award winning producer, and former candidate for mayor of Durham.

Born and raised in Durham, Pierce has traveled the world, building spaces for creative expression and social justice. He founded Blackspace, a digital maker space where youth learn about music, film and coding. He is the writer, composer and co-director of an animated film series called History of White People in America, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2018. In 2012 he co-founded Beat Making Lab, a PBS web-series, which took him from community centers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to making beats with environmentalist Jane Goodall. He is the frontman of the jazz and hip-hop band The Beast.

Pierce earned a BA in African and African American Studies at UNC Chapel Hill and an MA in Pan African Studies at Syracuse University. He has taught music, political science, and African American studies at both UNC Chapel Hill and North Carolina Central University. Pierce lives in Durham with his wife of 10 years and their two children.

Lynden Harris

Lynden Harris is the founder of Hidden Voices, a radically inclusive, participatory, and co-creative collective committed to creating a just, compassionate, and sustainable world.   For seventeen years, Lynden has collaborated with underrepresented communities to create award-winning works that combine narrative, performance, mapping, music, digital media, and interactive exhibits.

During her decades facilitating community connections, Lynden developed a participatory workshop model to empower change through collective visioning and collaborative action.  This process facilitates a dynamic exchange between documentary, art, and community that allows for a multiplicity of voices and a multiplexity of understandings.

Former Artistic Director of ArtsCenter Stage, Lynden is a member of the MAP Fund Class of 2016 for Serving Life:  ReVisioning Justice and in 2014 was named a Founding Cultural Agent for the US Dept. of Arts and Culture. www.usdac.usShe also teachesStories for Social Change (Theatre, Public Policy, Documentary Studies, Women’s Studies) at Duke University and writes for the News and Observer family of papers about community voices, the arts, and social justice.

Her play COUNT recently premiered at Playmakers Repertory Company and TO BUY the SUN tours NYC, Yale, and Washington, DC in April 2018.

Lynden is a founding member of the Duke Transformative Prison Project.

Sheryl Oring

Sheryl Oring has typed thousands of postcards to the President from locations across the U.S. since launching her “I Wish to Say” project in 2004. Her book, “Activating Democracy: The I Wish to Say Project,” was published by University of Chicago Press in 2016. Other recent projects include “Travel Desk,” a public art commission at the San Diego International Airport and “Maueramt,” a performance and exhibition done in Berlin on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Oring has shown her work Bryant Park in Manhattan; the Jewish Museum Berlin; and the McCormick Freedom Museum in Chicago. She has also presented work at Art in Odd Places in New York; the Art Prospect festival in St. Petersburg, Russia; Encuentro in Sao Paolo, Brazil; and the International Symposium on Electronic Art in Dubai. She is currently working on a large-scale public art commission for the Tampa International Airport. Oring, an Associate Professor of Art at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is the recipient of the North Carolina Arts Fellowship as well as grants from Franklin Furnace Fund, Creative Capital Foundation, the American Council on Germany and the New York Foundation for the Arts. A retrospective of her work will be featured this fall at the Lois and David Stulberg Gallery at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida, as well as at Art Prize in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Rosalia Torres-Weiner

Rosalia Torres-Weiner is an ARTivist. Her work is featured in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Anacostia Museum has been exhibited at McColl Center, Levine Museum of the New South, UNCC’s Projective Eye Gallery, the City of Raleigh Museum, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.  Her public murals celebrate the rich history and changing demographics of the South. She uses her art to document social conditions and raise awareness about issues affecting immigrant communities like family separation, racism and moving beyond common stereotypes. Her work will be featured in a solo exhibition at Georgia College in October 2018. Through her Mobile Art Studio, a 24-foot “Art Truck” she takes the arts directly to people in underserved areas in Charlotte.

UNC-TV Feature:http://myhome.unctv.org/rosalia-torres-weiner-artivist/

Alisha ​B​. Wormsley

Alisha B. Wormsley is an interdisciplinary artist and cultural producer. Her work is about collective memory and the synchronicity of time, specifically through the stories of women of color. Wormsley’s work has been honored and supported for programs: afronaut(a) film and performance series, Homewood Artist Residency (recently received the mayor’s public art award), the Children of NAN video art series, There Are Black People in the Future body of work, and her collaborative works with Lisa Harris in Studio Enertia. These projects and works have exhibited widely.  She is currently working on a number of public art projects and screening her new Children of NAN film. Wormsley currently teaches Electronic Media at Carnegie Mellon University.


Lynden Harris

Lynden Harris is the founder of Hidden Voices, a radically inclusive, participatory, and co-creative collective committed to creating a just, compassionate, and sustainable world.   For seventeen years, Lynden has collaborated with underrepresented communities to create award-winning works that combine narrative, performance, mapping, music, digital media, and interactive exhibits.

During her decades facilitating community connections, Lynden developed a participatory workshop model to empower change through collective visioning and collaborative action.  This process facilitates a dynamic exchange between documentary, art, and community that allows for a multiplicity of voices and a multiplexity of understandings.

Former Artistic Director of ArtsCenter Stage, Lynden is a member of the MAP Fund Class of 2016 for Serving Life:  ReVisioning Justice and in 2014 was named a Founding Cultural Agent for the US Dept. of Arts and Culture. www.usdac.usShe also teachesStories for Social Change (Theatre, Public Policy, Documentary Studies, Women’s Studies) at Duke University and writes for the News and Observer family of papers about community voices, the arts, and social justice.

Her play COUNT recently premiered at Playmakers Repertory Company and TO BUY the SUN tours NYC, Yale, and Washington, DC in April 2018.

Lynden is a founding member of the Duke Transformative Prison Project.

Sheryl Oring

Sheryl Oring has typed thousands of postcards to the President from locations across the U.S. since launching her “I Wish to Say” project in 2004. Her book, “Activating Democracy: The I Wish to Say Project,” was published by University of Chicago Press in 2016. Other recent projects include “Travel Desk,” a public art commission at the San Diego International Airport and “Maueramt,” a performance and exhibition done in Berlin on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Oring has shown her work Bryant Park in Manhattan; the Jewish Museum Berlin; and the McCormick Freedom Museum in Chicago. She has also presented work at Art in Odd Places in New York; the Art Prospect festival in St. Petersburg, Russia; Encuentro in Sao Paolo, Brazil; and the International Symposium on Electronic Art in Dubai. She is currently working on a large-scale public art commission for the Tampa International Airport. Oring, an Associate Professor of Art at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is the recipient of the North Carolina Arts Fellowship as well as grants from Franklin Furnace Fund, Creative Capital Foundation, the American Council on Germany and the New York Foundation for the Arts. A retrospective of her work will be featured this fall at the Lois and David Stulberg Gallery at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida, as well as at Art Prize in Grand Rapids, Michigan.